CIMB Classic Preview What They Said

Wed 29 Oct 2014

CIMB Classic Preview What They Said

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SERGIO GARCIA
CHRIS REIMER:  We want to welcome and thank Sergio Garcia for joining us here they media center at the CIMB Classic.  Coming back to Malaysia, talk about this event and why playing in this area of the world is important for players like yourself and the PGA TOUR.
SERGIO GARCIA:  Yeah, I think it's obviously nice to be back here in Kuala Lumpur.  The course is a little bit soft, but it's in great shape again.  Obviously after last year, it was a great experience.  It was an easy decision to come back here.  I think like you mentioned, it's nice to come around these parts of the world and get to play a little bit now at the end of the year.  I've always said it; I feel like I'm a global player, and that obviously extends to Asia and all parts of the world.  I try to move around as much as I can, and these next three or four weeks are going to be very interesting.
Q.  On the travel schedule, you seem to be a player who travels well.  A lot of the guys who play on the PGA TOUR recently are coming out to event like this, it's a relatively new thing for them.  Do you give them advice on how best to adjust to travel?
SERGIO GARCIA:  Well, I think being European and playing the European Tour, that obviously moves a lot more than the PGA TOUR.  You kind of get used to some of these traveling experiences, I guess.
But I think at the end of the day, it's just a matter of getting used to it and trying to take it with the best attitude possible.  Obviously probably the hardest thing is getting used to the jet lag and stuff like that, but when you come    when you have the possibility of coming to new countries, new places that you've never been, I think it's always a great experience, and that's the way everybody should take it.
Q.  Your win in Johor, which I think was last year or the year before was a great event for you, and for us it was terrific for you to be here.  How do you compare the golf course in Johor with the one here and the golf courses that you've played on in Malaysia generally speaking?
SERGIO GARCIA:  Yeah, I wouldn't say    I don't think it's too different, this golf course, from the one in Johor.  Maybe, I don't know, I think maybe it's got a little bit more movement, this one.  But the one in Johor also had some up and downs and stuff like that.
I think the type of golf course, it's fairly similar, two fun courses to play.  I think that they're the kind of courses that give you a lot of different options.  You can be really, really aggressive if you want or a little bit more conservative and then give yourself longer shots into the greens.
But they're two solid golf courses and two nice tournaments to go and play.
Q.  As well as travel is an issue for a lot of players these days, how much rest to give themselves.  You've had a bit of a gap since the Ryder Cup, other players have been out playing.  How do you make your decisions as a global player where to play and when and how much?
SERGIO GARCIA:  Well, like you said, obviously I travel a bit more than most guys on the PGA TOUR because I play on both Tours, so I try to pick my spots as well as I can, make sure that I go through stretches where I play but also through some stretches of maybe two, three or four weeks off like I just had, mainly because, like I said before, obviously traveling is nice, but it also takes energy out of you, and sometimes you need to disconnect a little bit and kind of recharge those batteries.
I think that it's just a matter of finding what clicks for you.  Everybody is different.  There's some guys that like to play more, there's some guys that like to play less, but it's just a matter of finding what feels like better for you.
Q.  I just wanted to get your perspective on playing the majors.  You came close several times before, and you're a little older now.  Has your perspective or would you think that your approach would be different as you go into 2015?
SERGIO GARCIA:  No, I wouldn't say so.  I think that my approach is still the same.  It's still trying to go every week, and obviously majors are no different, trying to play the best I can, trying to put myself in a situation to have a solid chance at winning, like I've done in the past, and then try to perform as well as I can then.
It sounds simpler than maybe it is, but it's pretty much that.
Q.  Any particular favorite holes on this course or a hole that sets up really well for you?
SERGIO GARCIA:  I don't know.  There's some fun holes out there.  I think there's a couple new tees.  Obviously the 12th hole is a lot tougher now without being able to carry the bunkers.  I think the 11th hole is a nice par 3, quite difficult.  But you get a nice mix of holes with water where you can make birdies or even an eagle, and if you struggle a little bit, you can easily make a bogey.  You can see some big swings in some of these holes.
Q.  Golf is a rare sport because of the length of careers.  We had Davis Love in here who at age 50 is still out competing on the PGA TOUR.  It allows players to be exposed or even play alongside some of their heroes.  Do you have any memories growing up of one of your golf heroes, one of your mentors kind of taking you aside or a story where you had to pinch yourself because of who you were with or where you were?
SERGIO GARCIA:  Yeah, obviously I had the pleasure of playing with Olazábal and Seve when I was growing up, just as a professional.  It's great to be able to    I think that's one of the most amazing things that you get in golf.  That you're 13 or 14 and you're seeing all these great players play when they're in their mid 30s or 40s, and you can't really have a chance of doing that and being able to play when you're 20 with guys that are 45 or 50 in really any other sport.  It's great to be able to have that opportunity and obviously learn from them and get some of your dreams come true by playing with them and get some nice insights and some nice advice from all those players.
Q.  You play on both tours, you have a home on both continents.  What do you consider yourself to be, European or American or    where is your real home?
SERGIO GARCIA:  No, I'm definitely European.  Well, I mean, my home is in Switzerland.  Obviously I've been living there since 2002.  There and Spain, obviously, that kind of feels a little bit like home, too, growing up there and being Spanish.
But like I said before, we're obviously very fortunate to be able to travel the world and do what we love, which is playing golf and make some people happy with it, other than ourselves, and hopefully be able to do it for many more years.
Q.  You've come from the Ryder Cup to here and you find yourself in a group with Lee Westwood and Patrick Reed.  Does it bring back some fond memories?  Are you still on a high from that Ryder Cup?
SERGIO GARCIA:  Yeah, I guess so.  I guess there's still a lot of memories coming from four weeks ago at the Ryder Cup.  It was, like always, an amazing experience.  It's going to be fun to be able to play with both of them.  Obviously I'm quite friendly with Lee, so it should be good fun to be able to play with both, and hopefully we'll be playing well.
Q.  Do you prefer match play or stroke play?
SERGIO GARCIA:  I guess we play stroke play pretty much all year round.  We have three or four tournaments where we play match play.  It's nice to change it up here and there.
I think that at the end of the day, stroke play is probably the fairest kind of thing for all year round, but it's good fun to be able to play match play here and there and play with a different kind of mentality sometimes.
Q.  90 percent of the world's golfers, the amateurs are always playing match play.
SERGIO GARCIA:  That's true.  As an amateur, yeah, your tournaments, there's a lot of match play events that you play as an amateur, and also when you're back at home, too, you pretty much play match play all the time.  You know, it's good fun to be able to do it once in a while, but I guess we get a taste of match play a little bit here and there.  Maybe not as much as stroke play, obviously, but at the end of the day, I think stroke play is nicer for the people to be able to see everybody throughout the whole day, throughout the whole tournament, instead of just one or two rounds.
Q.  You've played golf a lot in Asia in the past decade or so.  How much    what are the changes that you've seen that have taken place on this side of the world here?
SERGIO GARCIA:  Well, I think you can definitely see that the people are a lot more involved into the game.  You can see that the awareness level is much higher than it was maybe 15, 20 years ago, so it's nice to see that obviously all the Asians are getting into the game a lot more, and you start to see a lot more Asian players playing on both the PGA TOUR and the European Tour, and that's great.  It's a great market to grow and to bring up, and hopefully we'll be able to keep our level up, because in some years, it might take over.
CHRIS REIMER:  Thank you, Sergio.  Good luck this week.
[caption id="attachment_31072" align="alignleft" width="300"]Lee Westwood of England Lee Westwood of England
LEE WESTWOOD
CHRIS REIMER:  We want to thank Lee Westwood for joining us here in the interview room at the CIMB Classic, obviously a place where you have some fond memories, winning here earlier this year.  Talk first about your memories of that championship and what you recall from winning.
LEE WESTWOOD:  Yeah, well, I mean, it's pretty fresh in my mind.  It's not been that long ago.  It was only April, and I played well all week.  I got off to a quick start.  I was 65, I think, and then 66, and put myself in good position over the weekend, and then just stretched away and ended up winning by six.  That was a great week, and it's strange that I'm going to be playing three tournaments in 10 months on this golf course.  It doesn't often happen, moving the Malaysian Open up next year to February time, and there's obviously the reason for that, and then this tournament.  So it's obviously a good golf course because they keep putting tournaments around it, and people enjoy playing it, I think.  Greens, tees, fairways, they're all in good shape, and I'm looking forward to the week.
CHRIS REIMER:  Talk about the golf course itself.  You mentioned it's a good course.  I know a number of players have liked the variety of some of the holes, different clubs off tee boxes.  What do you like about it?
LEE WESTWOOD:  I like the variation to it.  I like that it makes you think.  You know, there's driver off a lot of holes, but you don't have to hit driver.  It gives you options even on the par 5s.  It's tightened up quite a bit on holes like 3 and you could hit 3 wood up there, but if you want to take it on with driver, it's possible.  I think it's a good golf course strategically wise, as well.
Q.  Fits your game well?
LEE WESTWOOD:  Obviously.  I played it once at 18 under and won by six, so you'd have to say that it suits my game.
Q.  How confident are you coming back to defend?
LEE WESTWOOD:  Well, I'm not defending champion of this tournament, but I'm the most recent winner around this golf course, so I'm pretty confident as far as this week's tournament is concerned.  I'm playing nicely at the moment, as well.  I played well in Napa a couple weeks ago, and it's nice for me that it's a nice setting of a PGA TOUR event around a golf course where I have the most recent win.
Q.  You've been here so many times.  Welcome back yet again.  What is it about Malaysia other than the golf courses and the golf that you play here that appeals to you most of all?
LEE WESTWOOD:  I've always enjoyed coming to Asia, not just Malaysia, but Malaysia is one of my favorite spots.  People are great, the city, Kuala Lumpur is fantastic.  The country itself is wonderful.  I think it's a great place to come play.  Obviously the heat seems to suit me.  I always seem to play well when it's really hot and steamy.  It's just a nice place for me to come and play.  I've always enjoyed coming here.  The first time was in '94, I think, and I've been coming back most years for one reason or another.
Q.  Intriguing match up, intriguing group with Sergio and Patrick.  Good to have that Ryder Cup rivalry there or would you like to make a new set of faces?
LEE WESTWOOD:  No, I don't think we'll have any sort of Ryder Cup thing.  Two good guys to play with.  I enjoy both's company.  Obviously Sergio I've played with a lot, and Patrick I've played with once or twice, but he's obviously a very good player.  His tournament wins recently and obviously the way he played at the Ryder Cup in the singles backs that up, and it should be a good three ball to watch I would think.
Q.  As a guy who's played all over the world, one of the more accomplished players in the field, talk about the growth of the game and where you've seen golf grow in Malaysia and Asia and places the PGA TOUR is now visiting outside of the United States?
LEE WESTWOOD:  Yeah, I don't think anybody could have dreamt the PGA TOUR would be playing events outside of America and certainly in places like Malaysia and China 20 years ago.  The golf courses have improved dramatically.  The purses have improved dramatically.  Through that, the quality of the Asian golfers themselves have improved.  You've got people like Matsuyama and Seung Yul Noh and people like that playing on the PGA TOUR and winning, Sang Moon Bae recently, as well, in Napa.  I think that all sort of snowballed, and the PGA TOUR and people like that realize that there's an emerging market, and it's a great place to come and play.
Q.  Do you get a kick out of some of the U.S. players complaining about jet lag after all the traveling you've done in your career?
LEE WESTWOOD:  Yeah, I don't think there's any real way to get over jet lag.  I think certainly I can testify to it, and there's no simple way to get over it other than time really.  But yeah, I would imagine if you don't travel much, then it comes as a bit of a shock with a 12 hour time change from the East Coast of America.
Q.  Has your move to Florida made a big difference to your life as well as your golf?
LEE WESTWOOD:  Well, certainly the last couple of years I've been a lot less jet lagged.  When I was playing in America playing the PGA TOUR I was back and forth a lot more.  Obviously living in Florida makes that a lot easier, and the times when I want to practice and do most of my work at home, the weather is fantastic down in Florida.  It cools down and there's great practice facilities down there, and the greens are running fast and as quick as I would see when I play on the TOUR, and it's been a good move.
Q.  Just as someone who is really experienced on this course, what do you think is the character of the course?  What do you most need on this course as opposed to others?
LEE WESTWOOD:  I think you need to manage your body.  It's really important to stay fueled and well hydrated, first and foremost.  You're not going to function if you get dehydrated out there and lose energy.  Your brain is going to stop working.  And then you need to use your common sense and have good course management skills.  I think there are a lot of opportunities to take holes on out there, but at the same time there are a lot of opportunities to play conservatively and take par on certain holes.
It gives you chances with regard to the par 5s, making birdie on those, and I think hitting the fairway is going to be paramount, especially if the conditions are wet.  You don't want to be coming out of the rough because the greens seem to stay firm.  Hitting a lot of fairways and setting up iron shots that you can be aggressive with.
CHRIS REIMER:  Lee, thank you.  Good luck.
DAVIS LOVE III
CHRIS REIMER:  We want to welcome and thank Davis Love III for joining us here at the media center at the CIMB Classic in Malaysia.  Coming off another successful McGladrey Classic, let's start off with a quick comment.  Have you taken time to think what you've accomplished at your event there in St. Simons in Sea Island, and just looking back, how proud are you of what that event has become in a short amount of time?
DAVIS LOVE III:  Well, yeah, in five years we've done an awful lot with our event.  It's very exciting to have it over with.  It's a busy week, so we're excited to move on and play golf here.  But it's been a topic of discussion.  I just rode out with Danny Lee.  We talked about the tournament all the way out here and then sat down with some guys at lunch and had discussion of what we're doing next year.  So it's a big part of our life now, and I know the players know that I'm involved, that we're running the event, and that we're also looking out for them, trying to make the tournament better every year.
But it was an exciting week.  They ask me every year there, how do you play and host, and I say, I'm really focused on my golf, so now it's nice that I can just come here and just play and look forward to getting my year kicked off because it's been a busy couple weeks to try to play and host, but now I'm 100 percent focused on playing golf.  That's why I'm here and why I'll be playing in Cancún in a couple weeks to get my year going.
Q.  Talk about how excited you are to be here in Malaysia playing at the CIMB Classic.
DAVIS LOVE III:  Yeah, it's my first time here.  I was lucky enough to have dinner with the deputy prime minister last night, and he was shocked that it was my first trip here, and so at 50 years old now I can start my world travels, I guess.
The last 10 years I've really been focused on our TOUR, staying home, basically only have played the British Open is the only real trip I've made.  Now family and business will allow me to expand my horizons a little bit, so I'm going to try to play a little bit more all around the world, try to play in some of these events that I get invited to.  I thank CIMB for giving me the opportunity, and I'm looking very forward to my first tournament in Malaysia.
Q.  You've accomplished a lot in your career.  Is there anything else that you want to tick off on your list?
DAVIS LOVE III:  Yeah, I'd like a win in Malaysia added to my resumé.  No, I seriously want to play a lot of PGA TOUR golf the next few years and see if I can get my game back.  I had a major neck surgery almost two years ago, and trying to bounce back from that, my game has been a little up and down.  I'm excited about working on my golf game now and trying to get back in a few of the bigger tournaments.  I'm not in THE PLAYERS Championship, I'm not in the Masters, I'm not in the British Open next year, so I'm working hard on those kind of things.
I had a few years where I was very, very busy with the Ryder Cup with the neck surgery, and now I really want to focus on my golf game for a couple years.  I've got a great opportunity.  I'm eligible for both tours, the regular Tour and the Champions Tour, so I'm going to take advantage of that while I'm still fresh and ready to play
Q.  (No microphone.)
DAVIS LOVE III:  Well, I was out for three months.  I lost 80 percent of the strength in my left arm.  The surgery I bounced back from pretty quickly.  Six or eight weeks, I was ready to go physically, and actually during my first couple weeks of recovery, I was actually putting the day after surgery, but the strength in my arm wouldn't allow me to hit golf balls.  So building my strength back up, building my stamina, even at this point I'm still getting better every month.  They said two to two and a half years of improvement, so I'm still six or eight months from hopefully my peak.  Peyton Manning, who plays U.S. football, had the same surgery, took him about two years to get back to 100 percent, and now he's back to maybe 150 percent.  He's playing the best football of his life.  It's encouraging that I can come back from it.  My ball striking has gotten better and better it seems like over the next year, so hopefully that will continue to improve.
I need maybe some brain surgery to get my putting a little bit better, but that's typical for all golfers.  If the putting comes around, the ball striking is there for me to be able to compete.
Q.  You've accomplished so much in your life; what is the motivation?  Today we've heard Danny Chia, a Malaysian, neck surgery, you've had neck surgery, Jason has had neck surgery.  What is it that inspires you and keeps you going?
DAVIS LOVE III:  Well, my father gave me a great challenge when I was going into high level amateur golf and looking towards a pro career.  He said, let's just see how good you can get.  So I'm always striving to get better, whether I've won tournaments or not.  I still try to get better.  I still try to improve.  I was out there on the range yesterday working on my swing tips that my brother gave me last week, and I always want to get better.  I always want to play better.
You know, I could have missed the cut easily last week, and I could have not shot 4 under on Sunday and moved up to the middle of the pack, but I'm always grinding it out trying to get as much as I can out of my game, and I know that that's why I've lasted this long is because I have a passion for improving.
But I can see the    now I can see the light at the end of the tunnel, and I know that my time in the game will eventually fade away, but I want to take advantage of that for as long as I can and continue to compete.  My friend Fred Couples had one of my favorite lines:  He goes, everything we go through, it's worth it for the four hours inside the ropes.  So all the hard work, all the surgeries, all the travel, whatever it is, things that we have to work hard at, it's worth it to get inside the ropes for four hours and play golf and compete, and I love that.  I look forward to it.  I'm excited about tomorrow.  I'm excited about two weeks from now.  I'm excited about playing in Hawai'i in January.  I think it's just because we're competitive.  When you look at Tiger Woods or Phil Mickelson, it doesn't matter what they do, whether it's table tennis or golf, they're competitive at it.  Or Michael Jordan; doesn't matter what he does, he wants to compete.  I think that's something in us that makes us good golfers and makes us good athletes is we have that desire just to get out and compete.
Q.  Just a thing or two about course design:  What do you think of the layout here, the peculiarities, the character of this course?
DAVIS LOVE III:  So far I love it.  I haven't been on the course yet.  We got rained out yesterday afternoon.  I've heard a lot about it.  You know, different    seems like there's a lot of variety of holes.  You have to hit driver all the way    some guys are saying watch out on this hole or that hole, you might just want to hit a 4 iron off the tee.  I talked to Billy Horschel at dinner and he told me a lot about the golf course and told me he really likes it, so I'm excited to see it.
Again, I've never played in Malaysia so I don't know the style of golf courses, but I'm interested to see it, and hopefully we get the full pro am in today because that's going to have to be my practice round because of the rain yesterday afternoon.
Q.  As a co sanctioned event here in Malaysia, how important is it to expose the folks in Malaysia to some of the best players in the world and kind of grow the game?
DAVIS LOVE III:  Well, I think being on the board of the TOUR four times and seeing our commissioner really focused on spreading the game around the world, playing in China, playing in Malaysia, playing in México, this Fall Series really shows that the U.S. PGA TOUR is working with all the other tours trying to grow the game and expose the game and expose players like me to new places to play.  It's working well.
I think with television, with travel, it's really amazing where golf has gone, and over half the players on our TOUR are from around the world.  It really is a global game now.
Q.  You mentioned before Champions Tour.  What are your plans going forward on that?
DAVIS LOVE III:  I don't know what my balance is going to be.  Fortunately CIMB invited me to play this week, or otherwise I wouldn't be in, so I'm getting some exemptions into some nice tournaments based on my past record.  But you can't get that for THE PLAYERS Championship or the British Open, so if I'm off some of the major    the bigger weeks, I'll take advantage of my eligibility on the Champions Tour and plug those holes so I can keep playing.  I did get invited by Mitsubishi to play in Hawai'i at the start of the year, so I'll play a regular Tour event one week in Hawai'i and then the next week play a Champions Tour.  I'm going to do a lot what I see Vijay Singh doing, cherry picking the good ones on both tours and enjoying the benefits of being a lifetime member on both tours.  I'm excited about having a place to play.  That's I think the benefit of having a really nice career is you have a place to play when you're 50 years old, and I'm going to take advantage of that for sure.
But there's great tournaments on both tours.  When I sit down and look at my schedule, there's weeks like the John Deere Classic that have done so much for charity, have done so much for me, Zach Johnson is a part of it, one of my best friends, I'll have a hard time not playing John Deere.  I have places like Memphis that do so much for the children's hospital.  It will be hard for me to skip Memphis just because of a personal connection to it.  Obviously playing in the Southeast, a lot of those tournaments like Hilton Head that have been so good to me, but then on the flipside, my son is at school in Alabama and there's Champions Tour events in Alabama, so there's reasons to play everywhere, and I'm just going to skip around and play both tours.
But I think for this year, I'm going to really focus on, and maybe even the following season, focus on trying to get some FedEx points, try to get in THE PLAYERS.  I'd like to play THE PLAYERS or all the majors obviously one or two more times, so I'm going to have to focus on our TOUR to get into those tournaments.
Q.  Just wanted you to recall, I believe 1997, a tremendous year for you, your launched your book, as well, you won the PGA.  Would you like to share your thoughts on that hallmark year for you?
DAVIS LOVE III:  Well, yeah, I'll always be remembered for the PGA Championship and certainly the way it finished with Justin Leonard had won the British Open that year, one of my great friends, coming down the last hole with a rainbow over the clubhouse, and Jim Nantz so eloquently reminding people of my father who had passed away almost 10 years before.
It was an incredible week to shoot three 66s on a place like Winged Foot and win a major championship and have a great year.  Tom Kite was involved not only in that tournament but as Ryder Cup captain, one of my great mentors, so it was just an incredible    a lot of great story lines that year, and it was a great year for me and really launched me into having confidence to play at the highest level for years to come.
Q.  You've had to sacrifice so much.  How could you sum up advice to young Malaysians who aspire to reaching greater heights?  What's the biggest single thing they need to have?
DAVIS LOVE III:  Well, I think practice and determination I think are the biggest things.  The thing I see is with the best players is just a commitment to do the little things day in and day out that make you a good player and stick with it.  When I see all the way from Greg Norman, Nick Price, Tiger Woods, the best players that I've played against, the world No. 1s, is they just relentless with their commitment to doing little things, whether it's in the gym, on the practice tee, or traveling around the world and playing, doing everything they can to improve their game day in and day out, and I think just a commitment to working hard is the biggest thing.  Obviously good instruction and good teachers and good trainers and sports psychologists, all those little things add up, but you have to be committed to working hard, and I see a lot of young players coming out of Sea Island where I live now, and you can tell the difference between the ones that are 100 percent bought in, they want to do everything they can to get better, and the ones that just want to play golf for fun.  I think that little bit of commitment and perseverance is what the kids need.
CHRIS REIMER:  Thank you, Davis.  Good luck this week.
ANIRBAN LAHIRI
THE MODERATOR:  Thank you for joining us, Anirban.  Currently second on the Order of Merit, won your first Asian Tour title last week in Macao.  Well done and congratulations.  Just your thoughts coming into this week, carrying a lot of confidence with you, as well.
ANIRBAN LAHIRI:  Thanks.  Yeah, last week was a big positive for me.  In a lot of ways I needed to start making a move in the World Rankings and also try to catch up to David a little bit, so it was a very good result for me.  This is a very important week, again, similar reasons, lots to play for.  I'm playing well.  I'm quite confident in how I'm playing, so I'm really looking forward to doing well this week, as well.
[caption id="attachment_37890" align="alignright" width="199"]Anirban Lahiri of India Anirban Lahiri of India
Q.  This is a golf course you've played on before.  Talk a little bit about the golf course and what's the key to playing well here?
ANIRBAN LAHIRI:  You know, in the last few years, it's usually been about keeping it on the fairways.  The roughs are brutal, and because of the rain it gets wet, and if it's wet, it's very difficult to control the ball.  This week, of course, the roughs are not as bad as they have been in the past, and the greens are a little bit softer because of all the rain.
I think the course is, again, set up very well for scoring, so you'll have to really make a lot of birdies this week.
Q.  How crucial will it be for you to finish ahead of David Lipsky this week?
ANIRBAN LAHIRI:  You know, it's difficult for me to go out on the golf course and just play with a result in mind.  Obviously it's an important week in terms of where the Order of Merit goes.  It's not just me.  It's such a big event that anyone behind us, as well, who finishes maybe top three will have a great chance.  So for me personally, I have to just look to play well.  Obviously the Order of Merit is something that I would like to win.  But having said that, there are other goals, other targets.  I'm not going to let that play on my mind so much, just focus on playing solid golf for four days.  I think if I can do that, the results will take care of themselves.
Q.  Have you recovered from the Eurasia Cup?  What a great event that was and the part that you played.  Does it make any difference to you who you're playing with?  Tomorrow I think you're playing with Matsuyama and Dufner.  Is that a formidable pair, or does it not make any difference?
ANIRBAN LAHIRI:  It's a really good pairing.  I really enjoy playing with good players and players of Dufner and Matsuyama's caliber.  They're world class players, so I'm really looking forward to that.  I think it just adds to the motivation of me playing my best, and as far as recovery is concerned, I think Malaysia has been really good to me this year, whether it was the Eurasia Cup or Selangor.  So it's nice to be back here, and even when I played the Malaysian Open here, I finished top 10 for the first time, so some good, positive memories from the golf course, as well.
So it's just nice to be back.  Obviously lots of    confidence is high, but come tomorrow, I'll just have to knuc