Rewind: Udorn Makes a Splash

Sun 25 Nov 2012

Rewind: Udorn Makes a Splash

  • SHARE
Khon Kaen, Thailand, November 25: The Asian Tour will make its return to Thailand for the King's Cup from November 29 to December 2. Following a year’s absence due to the floods in the capital city of Bangkok last year, the King's Cup is back and enjoying a welcome revival with its prize fund increasing to US$500,000. asiantour.com looks back at the 2010 edition where Thailand's Udorn Duangdecha emerged victorious.


Udorn Duangdecha had always wanted to jump into a lake to celebrate a victory on the Asian Tour. It took him 15 long years to finally realise his dream.

Overjoyed by a final round charge which saw him claim a popular victory at the King’s Cup on home soil, the colourful Udorn doused his red-hot form by taking the leap with his caddie into a pond next to the 18th green of the Singha Park Khon Kaen Golf Club.
“I’ve always wanted to do that and my caddie and I said let’s do it,” smile the 40-year-old veteran, who has plied his trade in Asia since 1995.
His long awaited victory was sweet as the King’s Cup is highly revered by Thai players as the event is held to commemorate the birthday of the King of Thailand.
“It is such an honour to win this tournament for the King. I really put in all my effort to win the King’s Cup and I’m glad it worked out in my favour. I want to dedicate this victory to my King,” said Udorn.
Starting the final round five strokes behind joint leaders Jbe Kruger of South Africa and countryman Prom Meesawat, Udorn closed with a stunning six-under-par 66 and showed there was more to him than vivid and striking coloured pants.
“The time felt right for me to win. I was feeling confident all day and hit every shot with determination. It was hard not to see all the big names on the leaderboard but I tried my best to ignore their scores and played against myself and remained focus. That eased some pressure,” said Udorn, who amassed a total of 12-under-par 276.
It was another case of so close but yet so far for Kruger as he rued a cold putter in a round of two birdies against three bogeys. He narrowly missed his 50 feet eagle putt on the final hole to force a play-off and settled for his third runner-up finish of the season.
“I hit the ball well but I could not buy a putt. I think the last putt was the only one I had a chance of scoring. If the putter is not working on the final day, you can never win,” said the slightly built South African, who posted rounds of 71, 65, 69 and 73 for a 278 total to finish two strokes behind of the champion.
“I’m playing really well and everything has to come together in the final round especially my putting. I’m in good form and I feel that my time to win will come soon,” he added.
Korean Mo Joong-kyung showed his liking for Thailand once again by finishing in a share of second place with Kruger and local star Pariya Junhasavasdikul. Mo, who won his second Asian Tour victory in Thailand in 2008, charged into contention after turning in 33 but his title aspiration was dashed with a bogey on hole 13.
“I had a good start but missed a few chances on the back nine. I could have played better but overall it was okay. I knew what I had to shoot to give myself a chance and I remained focus of achieving that,” said Mo, who closed with a 66.
“I looked to be on my way of having a chance of winning until my bogey on the 13th hole. That was very crucial, you can never make a bogey like that if you want to win a tournament,” added the two-time Asian Tour champion.
Ends.